A Pill That Can Replace the Need for DUI Attorneys

Posted by: Russell Hebets       22-Feb-2013       (0) Comments        Back to Main Blog

What would the world be like if you could drink as much as you want, but then sober up in only a few minutes by taking a pill? Some intrepid scientists are trying to make this future a reality in their new study and clinical trials in humans.

The study was testing a drug on rats to determine if they could sober them up. First, the researchers loaded rats so full of alcohol they couldn’t even stand up for an hour. Then they tested the drug and when under its influence the rats could stand up and begin functioning after only five minutes. After this test the researchers wanted to see how rats would function when put to a task that requires skill and concentration, which might be the equivalent of driving in humans. Unfortunately, none of the rats had a valid license, so they had to settle for a good old-fashioned lab rat maze. In this test the drunken rats became disoriented and cowered in the corner. The rats given the drug could perform the task of navigating the maze after a short period.

The drug is about to enter its first human trials, but if it is successful it might raise many questions. It is unclear at this point if a human subject would still record a BAC after using the drug. It is also unclear how long it would take to make an individual safe to do something such as drive. The drug might also have a great moral hazard by encouraging people to drink to excess. Overall it is probably too early to tell if this pill will one day make an experienced DUI attorney obsolete.


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